Archive for the ‘Climate Change’ Category

Solar energy generation in the UK increases by 840% in one year

A report published last Friday by the Department of Energy and Climate Change shows that while production of fossil fuels in the UK fell by 10.1% with both oil and natural gas production plummeting by 12.2% and 13.9% respectively, renewables generation increased by 6.5% in the second quarter of 2012, in comparison to the same period of the previous year. (more…)

European Solar PV capacity keeps increasing despite the reductions on the Feed-in Tariffs

Due to the benefits of solar energy and the drop of the cost of solar panel installations, and despite the recent reductions in the Feed-in Tariffs not only in the UK but also in Germany, Italy and Spain – where the green technology fundings were completely cut -, the figures of the total solar energy installed in Europe keep on growing.

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UK Residents Are Not Aware of the Benefits of Solar Energy

An online survey conducted by The Eco Experts revealed some interesting data about the relationship between the Britons and solar energy. There you go some facts!

Rising Energy Prices – Everyone’s problem

The survey reveals even the richest households in the UK are worried about the rising energy prices. Around 2/3rds of the surveyed say a sudden 30% increase in their energy bills couldn’t be afforded, and even among households earning more than £75,000 a year, 1/3rd claim they could not afford the increase. (more…)

What’s The Future of the Energy?

Around 85% of the energy consumed comes from fossil fuels (oil, coal and gas), and this demand is expected to increase 2% per year. Burning these materials produce large amounts of CO2 that are being to the atmosphere, damaging the environment and leading the way to climate change.

In this video from the University of Cambridge, a group of experts talk about the energy demand and consumption, and examine how wind power, carbon capture storage (CSS) and material efficiency are examples of reducing or capturing CO2 emissions and guarantee a safe and efficient future for the planet.

Via Cambridge Ideas – The future of energy? – University of Cambridge